In a recent speech, David Bosley spoke about instilling confidence,…

In a recent speech, David Bosley spoke about instilling confidence,…

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David Bosley recently spoke about using trust, responsibility and respect for authority to transform lives

“The path to getting other people to trust you begins with your ability to trust yourself,” says David Bosley, former director of Master’s Ranch

Teens aren’t sent to distant homes because the authorities who make decisions about their lives have great confidence in their trustworthiness, she says David Bossley. But with a refreshed mindset, reformed behavior patterns, and a restored approach to daily life, adds Bosley, former Master’s Ranch, former director, troubled young people can become trustworthy as they learn to trust themselves.

David Bosley: “We’re doing the right thing, period”

Some troubled young people have never received the basic moral instruction they need to make good life choices, says Bosley.

These young people need intensive instruction in the values ​​that shape moral action. According to Bosley, they need role models who are fully committed to practicing what they preach. You need the attitude, says Bosley: “We do the right thing, and that’s always what we do, period.”

But young people may need more than good role models to do this kind of learning, he says.

Modern psychiatrists and psychotherapists, Bosley says, are under intense pressure to tick the boxes that show they meet the criteria that justify their payments from state welfare agencies and insurance companies. Therefore, he adds, it is not uncommon for a therapist to sit hunched over a computer and take notes while counseling a young person.

David Bosley says nothing pulverizes empathy like it’s tied to an electronic device. The counseling sessions that change lives, he says, change them faster in an electronics-free environment.

Trust needs authenticity

“We all know how to walk the path rather than just talk, but trustworthy authenticity is more than that,” says Bosley. “Everyone “wobbles” …



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