HALIFAX, Nova Scotia, April 28, 2023 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The official naming ceremony of the future HMCS took place today William Hall, the fourth Arctic and Offshore Patrol Vessel (AOPS) underway at the Halifax shipyard for the Royal Canadian Navy. The six AOPS are named to honor other prominent Royal Canadian Navy heroes who have served their country with the highest distinction. Naming a ship is a historic and maritime tradition. Dating back centuries, this ritual is believed to bring good luck and safe travels to the ship and crew.

The ship’s sponsor, Chief Superintendent Craig Gibson (retired), officially christened the ship during a ceremony attended by the Secretary of Defense, the Honorable Anita Anand, Commander of the Royal Canadian Navy, Vice Admiral Angus Topshee, Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia, the The Honorable Arthur J. Leblanc, The Honorable Tim Houston, Premier of Nova Scotia, The Honorable Barbara Adams, NS Minister for Elderly and Long-Term Care, and descendants of William Hall, the ship company and the Halifax Shipyard shipbuilders .

As part of the event, Craig Gibson broke a bottle of Avondale Sky’s from Nova Scotia Blanc de Noir (2013) Sparkling wine in front of the ship’s bow and participating in Navy Tradition stated, “I call you William Hall. Bless this ship and all who sail in it.”

Craig Gibson is a 34-year retired veteran of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police who became the first black man to be promoted to the rank of Chief Superintendent as Commanding Officer of ā€œLā€ Division, Prince Edward Island, in August 2012. Craig Gibson grew up in Gibson Woods, a small black community where Gibson families (relatives of William Hall) settled as black Loyalists.

William Hall was the first black, the first Nova Scotian and one of the first Canadians to receive the British Empire’s highest decoration for bravery, the Victoria Cross. Hall received this recognition for his service at the Siege of Lucknow during the Indian…

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